WordCamp San Diego 2017: My Review

I have attended many WordCamps over the last several years. This year, I decided to volunteer to find out what goes on behind the scenes. It was actually my first WordCamp set in San Diego. For various reasons, something always conflicted with the dates after I had made a point of signing up right away. […]

By: Trish Daugherty March 30, 2017
Photo of San Diego WordCamp Volunteers

Photo of San Diego WordCamp Volunteers – by Kevin Hoffman

I have attended many WordCamps over the last several years. This year, I decided to volunteer to find out what goes on behind the scenes.

It was actually my first WordCamp set in San Diego. For various reasons, something always conflicted with the dates after I had made a point of signing up right away. Tickets sell out within a few hours normally for the most popular WordCamps, and I think San Diego is one of them. You can’t blame people from the Midwest and East Coast for wanting to come to San Diego in the Spring! Some come from as far as Europe to be at our WordCamp.

I followed the blog to buy a ticket as soon as they were available. Success! I then noticed they were looking for volunteers and decided it might be a good experience. Although I was told they had enough and planned to go as an attendee, I got an email a few weeks before the event asking me if I would still consider it.

I was happy to do it! Why? The biggest reason is to give back to this wonderful community.

If you didn’t know, WordPress is an “open source” web platform and the WordPress community is made up of volunteers. The organizers of a WordPress event begin planning months ahead of the and they are all volunteers. The WordPress community is primarily made up of WordPress Developers. These are experts that understand WordPress and are familiar with its core functions. Everyone has their particular strengths and interests; some create themes, others focus on developing plug-ins, while others are agencies or individuals who work with clients to help them with their websites. And if you didn’t know, today WordPress is the Number one content management system (CMS) today: It now powers 27.8 percent of all sites across the web.

As a volunteer, my duties included registration on the first day, helping out during the speakers’ sessions, monitoring the doors, and overseeing the all-important snack tables. The hardest part was getting up at 5 am that day. It was a long day so I didn’t make it to the after party that night – after volunteering for 12 hours!

Photo inside the Thomas Jefferson School of Law

Interior of the “classy” Thomas Jefferson School of Law, home of San Diego WordCamp 2017

So what was the best part? For me, it was great to have the time to meet and get to know the other volunteers and attendees. I had a chance to speak in depth with all of the sponsors, and that was invaluable for me as well. The venue was in an area of San Diego I don’t get to often but will after this. The Thomas Jefferson School of Law on Island Street is close to the Downtown Library and Petco Park. The building is new and modern – an outstanding place to host this event.

In conclusion, I give my experience a 5 out of 5. Volunteering is a great way to get to know your community, whether its WordPress or your

 

 

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